Daily Archives: November 28, 2011

Vendors Cite Other Paths to SDNs

Jim Duffy at NetworkWorld wrote an article earlier this month on protocol and API alternatives to OpenFlow as software-defined network (SDN) enablers.

It’s true, of course, that OpenFlow is a just one mechanism among many that can be used to bring SDNs to fruition. Many of the alternatives cited by Duffy, who quoted vendors and analysts in his piece, have been around longer than OpenFlow. Accordingly, they have been implemented by network-equipment vendors and deployed in commercial networks by enterprises and service providers. So, you know, they have that going for them, and it is not a paltry consideration.

No Panacea

Among the alternatives to OpenFlow mentioned in that article and in a sidebar companion piece were command-line interfaces (CLIs), Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP), Network Configuration Protocol (NETCONF), OpenStack, and virtualization APIs in offerings such as VMware’s vSphere.

I understand that different applications require different approaches to SDNs, and I’m staunchly in the reality-based camp that acknowledges OpenFlow is not a networking panacea. As I’ve noted previously on more than one occasion, the Open Networking Foundation (ONF), steered by a board of directors representing leading cloud-service operators, has designs on OpenFlow that will make it — at least initially — more valuable to so-called “web-scale” service providers than to enterprises. Purveyors of switches also get short shrift from the ONF.

So, no, OpenFlow isn’t all things to all SDNs, but neither are the alternative APIs and protocols cited in the NetworkWorld articles. Reality, even in the realm of SDNs, has more than one manifestation.

OpenFlow Fills the Void

For the most part, however, the alternatives to OpenFlow have legacies on their side. They’re tried and tested, and they have delivered value in real-world deployments. Then again, those legacies are double-edged swords. One might well ask — and I suppose I’m doing so here — if those foregoing alternatives to OpenFlow were so proficient at facilitating SDNs, then why is OpenFlow the recipient of such perceived need and demonstrable momentum today?

Those pre-existing protocols did many things right, but it’s obvious that they were not perceived to address at least some of the requirements and application scenarios where OpenFlow offers such compelling technological and market potential. The market abhors a vacuum, and OpenFlow has been called forth to fill a need.

Old-School Swagger

Relative to OpenFlow, CLIs seem a particularly poor choice for the realization of SDN-type programmability. In the NetworkWorld companion piece, Arista Networks CEO Jayshree Ullal is quoted as follows:

“There’s more than one way to be open. And there’s more than one way to scale. CLIs may not be a programmable interface with a (user interface) we are used to; but it’s the way real men build real networks today.”

Notwithstanding Ullal’s blatant appeal to engineering machismo, evoking a networking reprise of Saturday Night Live’s old “¿Quien Es Mas Macho?” sketches, I doubt that even the most red-blooded networking professionals would opt for CLIs as a means of SDN fulfillment. In qualifying her statement, Ullal seems to concede as much.

Rubbishing Pretensions

Over at the Big Switch Networks, Omar Baldonado isn’t shy about rubbishing CLI pretensions to SDN superstardom. Granted, Big Switch Networks isn’t a disinterested party when it comes to OpenFlow, but neither are any of the other networking vendors, whether happily ensconced on the OpenFlow bandwagon or throwing rotten tomatoes at it from alleys along the parade route.

Baldonado probably does more than is necessary to hammer home his case against CLIs for SDNs, but I think the following excerpt, in which he stresses that CLIs were and are meant to be used to configure network devices, summarizes his argument pithily:

“The CLI was not designed for layers of software above it to program the network. I think we’d all agree that if we were to put our software hats on and design such a programming API, we would not come up with a CLI!”

That seems about right, and I don’t think we need belabor the point further.

Other Options

What about some of the other OpenFlow alternatives, though? As I said, I think OpenFlow is well crafted for the purposes the high priests of the Open Networking Foundation have in store for it, but enterprises are a different matter, at least for the foreseeable future (which is perhaps more foreseeable by some than by others, your humble scribe included).

In a subsequent post — I’d like to say it will be my next one, but something else, doubtless shiny and superficially appealing, will probably intrude to capture my attentions — I’ll be looking at OpenStack’s applicability in an SDN context.