IBM-Johnson Controls Partnership Signals New Automation Wave

As Internet protocol proliferates, pervading every device that can possibly be networked, automated solutions are reaching into new realms and exploring untapped possibilities.

They’re also providing a dynamic foundation for new technology partnerships. One such partnership, which includes a smart-grid aspect, involves IBM and Johnson Controls.

The two companies are combining forces to improve the energy efficiency of office buildings and other commercial and industrial facilities. They’ll achieve that result by integrating IBM’s business-analytics software and middleware with Johnson’s building control technology. The objective is to deliver an automated system that will automatically turn off lights in unoccupied rooms or buildings, identify areas of heat loss, and shut off and turn on HVAC systems as required.

IBM and Johnson Controls worked together previously to deliver energy-efficiency solutions for the data center. As a result of those customer engagements and others, they realized more was possible.

Clay Nesler, Johnson Controls’ VP for Global Energy and Sustainability, explained how the partnership evolved:

“These capabilities have been available for a long time, but they haven’t been widely applied . . . . Both organizations are committed to open standards and Web technologies. So while this would have required a lot of engineering and R&D work several years ago, we now hope to leverage as many standards as possible,”

That’s the key: Standards are facilitating the development and delivery of automated-management solutions, including many of those applicable to the smart gird, that were too cumbersome, too unwieldy, too ocustomized (and therefore too expensive) in the past.

This is why the networked machine-to-machine (M2M) market is seen to offer so much promise, not just for IBM and Johnson Controls, but for every major information-vendor that has its eyes open and its skin in the game. Think of Intel, which can provide chips for the embedded devices; Cisco and its network infrastructure; Oracle with its analytics applications and databases; Dell with its servers; Ericsson with its wireless-networking technologies. Also consider the new business possibilities for wireless operators worldwide.

It’s a huge opportunity, and the smart grid, broadly defined, is a big piece of it. Technology vendors have a correspondingly large stake in ensuring that it is done right. Expect them to become active and involved partners with utilities, regulators, and governments.

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