Category Archives: Avaya

Avaya Executive Departures, Intrigue Continue

Like many other vendors, Avaya showed off its latest virtualized wares at VMworld in San Francisco this week. While putting its best face forward at VMware’s annual conference and exhibition, Avaya also experienced further behind-the-scenes executive intrigue.

Sources report that Carelyn Monroe, VP of Global Partner Support Services, resigned from the company last Friday. Monroe is said to have reported to Mike Runda, SVP and president of Avaya Client Services. She joined Avaya in 2009, coming over from Nortel.

Meanwhile, across the pond, Avaya has suffered another defection. James Stevenson, described as a “business-services expert” in a story published online by CRN ChannelWeb UK, has left Avaya to become director of operations for reseller Proximity Communications.

Prior to the departures of Monroe and Stevenson, CFO Anthony Massetti bolted for the exit door immediately after Avaya’s latest inauspicious quarterly results were filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Massetti was replaced by Dave Vellequette, who has a long history of of working alongside Avaya CEO Kevin Kennedy.

In some quarters, Kennedy’s reunion with Vellequette is being construed as a circle-the-wagons tactic in which the besieged CEO attempts to surround himself with steadfast loyalists. It probably won’t be long before we see a “Hitler parody” on YouTube about Avaya’s plight (like this one on interoperability problems with unified communications).

Avaya Questions Mount

Those of you following the tortuous (some might call it torturous) saga of Avaya Inc. might wish to visit the investor-relations section of Avaya’s website or peruse Avaya’s latest Form-10Q filing on the SEC website.

Yes, Avaya’s numbers for its third fiscal quarter of 2012, which ended on June 30, are available for review. I have given the results a cursory look, and I’ve concluded that the story hasn’t changed appreciably since I last wrote about Avaya’s travails. There’s still no prospect of significant revenue growth, quarterly losses continue to accrue, channel sales are edging lower across the company’s product portfolio, and the long-term debt overhang remains formidable.

Goodwill Impairment? 

And there’s something else, which I neglected to mention previously: a persistently high amount of goodwill on the asset side of the ledger, at least some of which might have to be written down before long. The company’s goodwill assumptions seem willfully optimistic, and even Avaya concedes that “it may be necessary to record impairment charges in the future” if “market conditions continue to deteriorate, or if the company is unable to execute on its cost-reduction efforts.” While I believe the company will persist with its cost-reduction efforts, I don’t see a meaningful near-term turnaround in macroeconomic conditions or in the growth profile of the company’s product portfolio. Ergo, impairment charges seem inevitable.

In this regard, what you need to know is that Avaya is carrying goodwill of about $4.2 billion on its books as of June 30, up from nearly $4.1 billion as of September 30, 2011. The company’s total assets are about $8.24 billion, which means goodwill accounts for more than half that total.

For those desirous of a quick summary of revenue and net loss for the year, I can report that total revenue, including sales of products and services, amounted to $1.25 billion in the quarter, down from $1.37 billion in the corresponding quarter last year, a year-on-year decrease of $122 million or about 9 percent. Product sales were down across the board, except in networking, where sales edged up modestly to $74 million in the quarter this year from $71 million last year. Service revenue also was down. For the nine-month period ended on June 30, revenues also were down compared to the same period the previous year, dropping from $4.13 billion last year to about $3.9 billion this year.

Mulling the Options

Avaya’s net loss in the quarter was $166 million, up from $152 million last year.

The critical challenge for Avaya will be growth. The books show that the company is maintaining level spending on research and development, but one wonders whether its acquisition strategy or its R&D efforts will be sufficient to identify a new source of meaningful revenue growth, especially as it finds itself under mounting pressure to contain costs and expunge ongoing losses. Meanwhile, a foreboding long-term debt looms, kicked down the road but still a notable concern.

With the road to IPO effectively blocked — I really can’t see a way for Avaya to get back on that track now — Avaya’s private-equity sponsors, Silver Lake Partners and TPG Capital, must consider their options. Is there a potential strategic acquirer out there? Can the company be sold in whole, or will it have to be sold in parts? Or will the sponsors just hang on, hoping continued cost cutting and a strategic overhaul, perhaps including a change in executive leadership, might get the company back on course?

Avaya’s Struggles Slip Under Industry Radar

As public companies, Nokia and Research In Motion have drawn considerable press coverage relating to their ongoing struggles. Nary a day passes without a barrage of articles on the latest setbacks and travails affecting both companies.  Some of the coverage is decidedly morbid, even ghoulish, with death-watch speculation on how soon one company or the other might be sold off or otherwise expire. 

Perhaps because it is private, Avaya has escaped such macabre notice from the mainstream business media and the industry trade press.  Nonetheless, speculation has arisen as to whether the company, richly backed by private-equity sponsors Silver Lake Partners and TPG Capital, has a future any brighter than the dim prospects attributed to RIM and Nokia. 

Abandoned IPO Hope  

At this particular juncture, the prospect of an IPO, which once seemed tantalizingly close for Avaya, seems a remote and forlorn hope.  As I’ve noted on a couple occasions before now, Avaya’s IPO was scuppered not only by its wan growth profile, but also by industry and macroeconomic headwinds that show no sign of abating. 

If no IPO is in the cards, what happens to the company? While at least one blogger has speculated that bankruptcy could be an option, I suspect the deep-pocketed private-equity sponsors might have no choice but to prop up Avaya until a buyer can be found. Given Avaya’s tepid growth prospects, its daunting long-term debt overhang, a recent weakening of channel sales, and stiffening competition across its product portfolio, the company is unlikely to find itself in the driver’s seat in any negotiations with a prospective buyer, presuming one can be found.  

Stranded in Purgatory 

Meanwhile, Avaya stakeholders, including the company’s employees, are mired in a purgatory. Sources have suggested the company will consolidate facilities and further reduce headcount, but no major announcements have been made on either front.

With an IPO seemingly off the table as an exit alternative, all eyes turn to the company’s private-equity sponsors. One potential delaying tactic, which we could see before the end of this calendar year, is the potential departure of president and CEO Kevin Kennedy, who has served in that dual capacity since January 2009. We’ve already seen revolving doors in the executive suites along Avaya’s mahogany row, and “new blood” in the CEO office would buy time for the company’s financial backers to devise and articulate a compelling narrative for customers, channel employees, employees, and potential strategic acquirers. 

We’ll have more insight into Avaya’s circumstances soon. The company is due to report its latest quarterly results within the next month or so.   

Tidbits: Cuts at Nokia, Rumored Cuts at Avaya

Nokia

Nokia says it will shed about 10,000 employees globally by the end of 2013 in a bid to reduce costs and streamline operations.

The company will close research-and-development centers, including one in Burnaby, British Columbia, and another in Ulm, Germany. Nokia will maintain its R&D operation in Salo, Finland, but it will close its manufacturing plant there.

Meanwhile, in an updated outlook, Nokia reported that “competitive industry dynamics” in the second quarter would hurt its smartphone sales more than originally anticipated. The company does not expect a performance improvement in the third quarter, and that dour forecast caused analysts and markets to react adversely.

Selling its bling-phone Vertu business to Swedish private-equity group EQT will help generate some cash, but, Nokia will retain a 10-percent minority stake in Vertu. Nokia probably should have said a wholesale goodbye to its bygone symbol of imperial ostentation.

Nokia might be saying goodbye to other businesses, too.  We shall see about Nokia-Siemens Networks, which I believe neither of the eponymous parties wants to own and would eagerly sell if somebody offering more than a bag of beans and fast-food discount coupons would step forward.

There’s no question that Nokia is bidding farewell to three vice presidents. Stepping down are Mary McDowell (mobile phones), Jerri DeVard (marketing), and Niklas Savander (EVP markets).

But Nokia is buying, too, shelling out an undisclosed sum for imaging company Scalado, looking to leverage that company’s technology to enhance the mobile-imaging and visualization capabilities of its Nokia Lumia smartphones.

Avaya

Meanwhile, staff reductions are rumored to be in the works at increasingly beleaguered Avaya.  Sources says a “large-scale” jobs cut is possible, with news perhaps surfacing later today, just two weeks before the end of the company’s third quarter.

Avaya’s financial results for its last quarter, as well as its limited growth profile and substantial long-term debt, suggested that hard choices were inevitable.

Last Week’s Leavings: Avaya and HP

Update on Avaya

Pursuant to a post I wrote earlier last week on Avaya’s latest quarterly financial results and its continue travails, I’m increasingly pessimistic about the company’s prospects to deliver a happy ending (as in a successful exit) for its principal private-equity stakeholders.  There’s no growth profile, cost containment has yet to yield profitability, and the long-term debt overhang remains ominous. The company could sell its networking business, but that would only buy a modest amount of latitude.

At a company all-hands meeting last week, which I mentioned in the aforementioned post, Avaya CEO Kevin Kennedy spoke but didn’t say anything momentous, according to our sources. Those sources described the session as “disappointing,” in that little was disclosed about the company’s plans to right the ship. Kennedy also didn’t talk much about the long-delayed IPO, though he did say its timing would be determined by the company’s sponsors — which is true, but doesn’t tell us anything.

Kennedy apparently did say that the employee headcount at the company is likely to be reduced through layoffs, attrition, and “restructuring,” the last of which typically results in layoffs. He also reportedly said Avaya had too many locations, which suggests that geographic consolidation is in the cards.

HP: Layoffs will continue until morale improves

Speaking of cuts, reports that HP might be shedding a whopping eight percent of its staff are troubling. Remember, HP is a company that was headed by Mark Hurd, a CEO notorious for his operational austerity. Hurd wielded the sharp budgetary implements so exuberantly, he must have brought tears to the eyes of Chainsaw Al Dunlap, former CEO of Sunbeam, who, like Hurd, was ousted under dubious circumstances.

During Hurd’s reign at HP, spending on R&D was slashed aggressively, and it was somewhat jokingly suggested that the tightfisted CEO might insist that his employees power their offices by riding electric stationary bikes.  After the Hurd years, and the desultory and fleeting rule of Leo Apotheker, HP now appears to be getting another whopping dollop of restructuring. The groups affected will be hit hard, and one wonders how morale throughout the company will be affected. We might learn more about the extent and nature of the cuts later today.

Avaya’s Latest Results Portend Hard Choices

Those of you following the Avaya saga might want to check out the company’s latest quarterly financial results, which are available in a Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

For Avaya backers hoping to see an IPO this year or in 2013, the results are not encouraging. In the three-month period that ended on March 31, Avaya generated revenue of $1.257 billion, with $637 million coming from product sales and $620 million from services. Those numbers were down from the correspondence quarter the previous year, when the company produced $1.39 billion in revenue, with product sales generating $757 million and services contributing $633 million. Basically, product sales were down sharply and services down slightly.

No Growth in Sight

Avaya also is seeing a weakening in channel sales. Moreover, growth from its networking products, on which the company had once pinned considerable hope, is stagnating. In the six-month period ending March 31, the company generated just $146 million from Avaya Network sales, down from $154 million in the preceding year. For the latest three-month period, concluding on the same date, networking sales were down to $64 million from $76 million last year. It is not projecting the profile of a growth engine.

Things are not much better in Avaya’s Global Communications Solutions (GCS) and Enterprise Collaboration Solutions (ECS) groups, which together account for the vast majority of the company’s product revenue. At this point, Avaya does not have a business unit on its balance sheet showing growth over the six- or three-month periods for which it filed its latest results.

Meanwhile, losses continue to mount and long-term debt remains distressingly high. Losses were down for both the three- and six-month periods reported by Avaya, but those mitigated losses were derived from persistent cost containment and cuts, which, if continued indefinitely, eventually (as in maybe now) hinder a company’s capacity to generate growth.

Interestingly, Avaya’s costs and operating expenses are down across the board, except for those attributable to “restructuring charges,” which are up markedly Avaya’s net loss for the six months ended on March 31 were $188 million as compared with $612 million last year. For the three-month period, the net loss was $162 million as compared with $432 million the previous year.

IPO Increasingly Unlikely

Although Avaya is not a public, and — company aspirations notwithstanding — does not appear to be on a trajectory to an IPO, markets reacted adversely to the financial results. Avaya bonds dropped to their lowest level in fourth months in response to the revenue decline, according to a Bloomberg report.

Avaya’s official message to stakeholders is that it will stay the course, but these results and market trends suggest a different outcome. Look for the company to explore its strategic options, perhaps considering a sale of itself in whole or in part. A sale of the floundering networking unit could buy time, but that, in and of itself, wouldn’t restore a growth profile to the company’s outlook.

Difficult choices loom for a company that has witnessed significant executive churn recently.

Departures from Avaya’s Mahogany Row Thicken IPO Plot

My plan was to continue writing posts about software defined networking (SDN). And why not?

SDN is controversial (at least in some quarters), innovative, intriguing, and potentially  disruptive to network-infrastructure economics and to the industry’s status quo. What’s more, the Open Networking Summit (ONS) took place this week in Santa Clara, California, serving a veritable gushing geyser of news, commentary, and vigorous debate.

But before I dive back into the overflowing SDN pool, I feel compelled to revisit Avaya. Ahh, yes, Avaya. Whenever I think I’m finished writing about that company, somebody or something pulls me back in.

Executive Tumult

I have written about Avaya’s long-pending IPO, which might not happen at all, and about the challenges the company faces to navigate shifting technological seas and changing industry dynamics. Avaya’s heavy debt load, its uncertain growth prospects, its seemingly shattered strategic compass, and its occasionally complicated relationship with its channel parters are all factors that mitigate against a successful IPO. Some believe the company might be forced into selling itself, in whole or in part, if not into possible bankruptcy.

I will not make a prediction here, but I have some news to report that suggests that something is afoot (executives, mainly) on Avaya’s mahogany row.  Sources with knowledge of the situation report a sequence of executive departures at the company, many of which can and have been confirmed.

On April 12, for example, Avaya disclosed in a regulatory filing with the SEC that “Mohamad S. Ali will step down as Senior Vice President and President, Avaya Client Services, to pursue other opportunities.” Ali’s departure was effective April 13.  Sources also inform me that a vice president who worked for Ali also left Avaya recently. Sure enough, if you check the LinkedIn profile of Martin Ingram, you will find that he left his role as vice president of global services this month after spending more than six years with the company. He has found employment SVP and CIO at Arise Virtual Solutions Inc.

As they say in infomercials, that’s not all.

Change Only Constant

Sources say Alan Baratz, who came to Avaya from Cisco Systems nearly four years ago, has left the company. Baratz, formerly SVP and president of Avaya’s Global Communications Solutions, had taken the role of SVP for  corporate development and strategy amid another in a long line of Avaya executive shuffles that had channel partners concerned about the stability of the company’s executive team.

Sources also report that Dan Berg, Avaya’s VP for R&D, who served as Skype’s CTO from January 2009 until joining Avaya in February 2011, will leave the company at the end of this month.

Furthermore, sources also say that David Downing, VP of worldwide technical operations, apparently has left the company this week. Downing was said to have reported to Joel Hackney, Avaya’s SVP for global sales and marketing and the president of field operations.

On the other side of the pond, it was reported yesterday in TechTarget’s MicroScope that Andrew Shepperd, Avaya’s managing director for the UK, left after just eight months on the job. Shepperd’s departure was preceded by other executive leave-takings earlier this year.

Vanishing IPO?

So, what does all this tumult mean, if anything? It’s possible that all these executives, perhaps like those before them, simply decided individually and separately that it was time for a change. Maybe this cluster of departures and defections is random. That’s one interpretation.

Another interpretation is that these departures are related to the dimming prospects for an IPO this year or next year. With no remunerative payoff above and beyond salary and bonuses on the horizon, these executives, or at least some of them, might have decided that the time was right to seek greener pastures. The company is facing a range of daunting challenges, some beyond its immediate control, and it wouldn’t be surprising to find that many executives have chosen to leave.

Fortunately, we won’t have to wait much longer for clarity from Avaya on where it is going and how it will get there. Sources tell me that Kevin Kennedy, president and CEO, has called an “all-hands meeting” on May 18.

For you SDN aficionados, fret not. We will now return to regularly scheduled programming.