Why Established Networking Vendors Aren’t Leading SDN Charge

Expressing equal parts exasperation and incredulity, Greg Ferro wonders why industry-leading networking vendors aren’t taking the innovative initiative in offering compelling strategies for software-defined networking (SDN).

The answer seems clear enough.

Although applications will be critical to the long-term commercial success of SDN, Google and the other movers and shakers that direct the affairs of the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) originally were drawn to SDN because they were frustrated with the lack of responsiveness and innovation from established vendors. As a result, they devised a networking model that not only separated the control and data planes of network elements, but that also, in the word’s of Google’s Amin Vahdat, separated the “ evolution path for (network) hardware and software.”

Two Paths

Until now, those evolutionary paths have been converged and constrained inside the largely propriety boxes of networking vendors. Google and its confreres with the ONF perceived that state of affairs as the yoke of vendor oppression. The network, slow to evolve and innovate, was getting in the way of progress.  All the combustible ingredients of a cloud-service provider insurrection had cohered. Google, taking the lead in organizing the other major service providers under the rubric of the ONF, lit the fuse.

The effects of the explosion are just being felt, and the reverberations will echo for some time. The big service providers, and perhaps many smaller ones, are gravitating away from the orbit of networking’s ancien regime. The question now is whether enterprises will follow. At some point, that probably will happen, but how and when it will unfold are less clear. Enterprises, unlike the board members of the ONF, are too diverse and prolific to organize in pursuit of common interests. Accordingly, vendors are still able to set the enterprise agenda.

But enterprises will notice the benefits that SDN is capable of conferring, and the ONF’s overlords will seek to cultivate and sustain an ecosystem that can deliver parallel hardware and software innovation. Google, for example, has indicated that while it develops its own networking hardware today, it would be amenable to buying OpenFlow switches from the vendor community. Those switches, like to carry lower margins and prices than the gear sold by the major networking vendors, will probably come from ODMs using merchant silicon from Broadcom, Marvell, Fulcrum (Intel), and others.

Money’s in the Software

The major networking vendors are saying that the cleavage of the control and data planes is not a big deal, that it’s not necessary or isn’t a critical requirement for innovation and network programmability. Perhaps there is some merit to their arguments, but there’s no question that the separation of the control and data planes is not in their business interests. If some their assertions have merit, they also are self-serving.

Cisco, as we’ve discussed before, might be able to develop software, but its business model is predicated on the sale of routers and switches. Effectively, it would have to remake itself comprehensively to recast itself as a vendor of server-based controllers (software) and the applications the run on them. A proprietary hardware box, whether a server or switch, isn’t what the ONF wants.

If the ONF’s SDN vision prevails, the money is in software: server-based controllers, applications, management/orchestration frameworks, and so on. Successful vendors not only will have to be proficient at developing software; they’ll also have to be skilled at marketing and selling it. They’ll have to build their businesses around it.

This is the challenge the major networking vendors confront. It’s why they aren’t leading the SDN charge, and it also is why they are attempting to co-opt and subvert it.

2 responses to “Why Established Networking Vendors Aren’t Leading SDN Charge

  1. Pingback: Why Established Networking Vendors Aren’t Leading SDN Charge … | cloudguys.net

  2. “The major networking vendors are saying that the cleavage of the control and data planes is not a big deal, that it’s not necessary or isn’t a critical requirement for innovation and network programmability.”

    Hmm. Maybe for others, especially those who have software architectures where the two are intertwined. However, the cleavage of control and data planes is critical to pretty much everything Juniper has done and will do on the software front. For example, on the switching front, virtual chassis and QFabric would not be possible without both the separation and distribution of those entities.

    It is a big deal as it enables both new management capabilities (multiple hardware devices behaving as one) and new network architectural options. As you correctly point out, anyone who says otherwise is SDN washing.

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