Avaya’s Latest Results Portend Hard Choices

Those of you following the Avaya saga might want to check out the company’s latest quarterly financial results, which are available in a Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

For Avaya backers hoping to see an IPO this year or in 2013, the results are not encouraging. In the three-month period that ended on March 31, Avaya generated revenue of $1.257 billion, with $637 million coming from product sales and $620 million from services. Those numbers were down from the correspondence quarter the previous year, when the company produced $1.39 billion in revenue, with product sales generating $757 million and services contributing $633 million. Basically, product sales were down sharply and services down slightly.

No Growth in Sight

Avaya also is seeing a weakening in channel sales. Moreover, growth from its networking products, on which the company had once pinned considerable hope, is stagnating. In the six-month period ending March 31, the company generated just $146 million from Avaya Network sales, down from $154 million in the preceding year. For the latest three-month period, concluding on the same date, networking sales were down to $64 million from $76 million last year. It is not projecting the profile of a growth engine.

Things are not much better in Avaya’s Global Communications Solutions (GCS) and Enterprise Collaboration Solutions (ECS) groups, which together account for the vast majority of the company’s product revenue. At this point, Avaya does not have a business unit on its balance sheet showing growth over the six- or three-month periods for which it filed its latest results.

Meanwhile, losses continue to mount and long-term debt remains distressingly high. Losses were down for both the three- and six-month periods reported by Avaya, but those mitigated losses were derived from persistent cost containment and cuts, which, if continued indefinitely, eventually (as in maybe now) hinder a company’s capacity to generate growth.

Interestingly, Avaya’s costs and operating expenses are down across the board, except for those attributable to “restructuring charges,” which are up markedly Avaya’s net loss for the six months ended on March 31 were $188 million as compared with $612 million last year. For the three-month period, the net loss was $162 million as compared with $432 million the previous year.

IPO Increasingly Unlikely

Although Avaya is not a public, and — company aspirations notwithstanding — does not appear to be on a trajectory to an IPO, markets reacted adversely to the financial results. Avaya bonds dropped to their lowest level in fourth months in response to the revenue decline, according to a Bloomberg report.

Avaya’s official message to stakeholders is that it will stay the course, but these results and market trends suggest a different outcome. Look for the company to explore its strategic options, perhaps considering a sale of itself in whole or in part. A sale of the floundering networking unit could buy time, but that, in and of itself, wouldn’t restore a growth profile to the company’s outlook.

Difficult choices loom for a company that has witnessed significant executive churn recently.

3 responses to “Avaya’s Latest Results Portend Hard Choices

  1. I spoke with Avaya at Interop last week and specifically asked about their networking line. I was told that sales were good compared to last year. Perhaps I was speaking to the wrong people.

    I think their switching line is decent from a technology perspective. Their wireless on the other hand is a bit perplexing. They are doubling down on the controller based system to the point of releasing a virtual controller in the near future to sit at branch/remote sites and back up a central controller in a DC. At least, that’s what I was told. Perhaps I heard them wrong. Almost every other vendor is going the other direction for the most part and running from controllers.

  2. Avaya is laying off it telephone support workers. Those are the people that have been helping customers for years with problems on their phone systems.

  3. not surprising…Their manager’s are no higher than a “C”…a lot of talk…no do…

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