Hardware Elephant in the HP Cloud

Taking another run at cloud computing, HP made news today with its strategy for the “Converged Cloud,” which focuses on hybrid cloud environments and provides a common architecture that spans existing data centers as well as private and public clouds.

In finally diving into infrastructure as a service (IaaS), with a public beta of HP Public Infrastructure as a Service slated for May 10, HP will go up against current IaaS market leader Amazon Web Services.

HP will tap OpenStack and hypervisor neutrality as it joins the battle. Not surprisingly, it also will leverage its own hardware portfolio for compute, storage, and networking — HP Converged Infrastructure, which it already has promoted for enterprise data centers — as well as a blend of software and services that is meant to provide bonding agents to keep customers in the HP fold regardless of where and how they want to run their applications.

Trying to Set the Cloud Agenda

In addition to HP Public Infrastructure as a Service — providing on-demand compute instances or virtual machines, online storage capacity, and cached content delivery — HP Cloud Services also will unveil a private beta of a relational database service for MySQL and a block storage service that supports movement of data from one compute instance to another.

While HP has chosen to go up against AWS in IaaS — though it apparently is targeting a different constituency from the one served by Amazon — perhaps a bigger story is that HP also will compete with other service providers, too, including other OpenStack purveyors.

There’s some risk in that decision, no question, but perhaps not as much as one might think. The long-term trend, already established at the largest cloud service providers on the planet, is to move away from branded, vanity hardware in favor of no-frills boxes from original design manufacturers (ODMs).  This will not only affect servers, but also storage and networking hardware, the latter of which has seen the rise of merchant silicon. HP can read the writing on the data-center wall, and it knows that it must attempt to set the cloud agenda, or cede the floor and watch its hardware sales atrophy.

Software and Services as Hooks

Hybrid clouds are HP’s best bet, though far from a sure thing. Indeed, one can interpret  HP’s Converged Cloud as a bulwark against what it would perceive as a premature decline in its hardware business.

Simply packaging and reselling OpenStack and a hypervisor of the customer’s choice wouldn’t achieve HP’s “sticky” business objectives, so it is tapping its software and services for the hooks and proprietary value that will keep customers from straying.

For managing hybrid environments, HP has its new Cloud Maps, which provides catalogue of prepackaged application templates to speed deployment of enterprise cloud-services applications.

To test the applications, the company offers HP Service Virtualization 2.0, which enables enterprise customers to test quality and performance of cloud or mobile applications without interfering with production systems. Meanwhile, HP Virtual Application Networks — which taps HP’s Intelligent Management Center (IMC) and the IMC Virtual Application Networks (VAN) Manager Module — also makes its debut. It is designed to eliminate network-related cloud-services bottlenecks by speeding application deployment, automating management, and ensuring service levels for virtual and cloud applications on HP’s FlexNetwork architecture.

Maintaining and Growing

HP also will launch two new networking services: HP Virtual Network Protection Service, which leverages best practices and is intended to set a baseline for security of network virtualization; and HP Network Cloud Optimization Service, which is intended to customers enhance their networks for delivery of cloud services.

For  enterprises that don’t want to manage their clouds, the company offers HP Enterprise Cloud Services as well as other services to get enterprises up to speed on how cloud can best be harnessed.

Whether the software and services will add sufficient stickiness to HP’s hardware business remains to be seen, but there’s no question that HP is looking to maintain existing revenue streams while establishing new ones.

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